The Physics
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Opus in profectus

Gravitational Potential Energy

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Practice

practice problem 1

Escape Velocity
  1. Calculate the speed needed to escape the Earth from its surface.
  2. Calculate the speed needed to escape the sun at the distance of the Earth's orbit.
  3. Calculate the speed needed to escape the Milky Way from the position of our solar system 25,000 light years from the galactic center or half the distance to the edge of the galaxy. (The sun's orbit encloses a mass that is 78.3 billion times the mass of the sun.)

solution

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practice problem 2

Event Horizon
  1. If the sun were a black hole what would be the radius of its event horizon?
  2. If the Earth were a black hole what would be the radius of its event horizon?
  3. If you were a black hole what would be the radius of your event horizon?

solution

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practice problem 3

Cosmic Expansion
When we look at galaxies and other objects outside our own Milky Way we see that they are generally moving away from us and that their recessional velocities are very nearly directly proportional to their distance. This observation was first made in 1929 by the American astronomer Edwin Hubble (1889–1953) and is now known as Hubble's law. Mathematically, Hubble's law is written…

v = Hr

Where…

v =  the object's recessional velocity (usually stated in km/s)
r =  the object's distance from the Milky Way (usually stated in megaparsecs or Mpc)
H =  a constant of proportionality known as the Hubble constant (69.3 ± 0.8 km/s/Mpc).

Perform the following set of calculations.

  1. Given that one parsec equals 3.08568 × 1016 m…
    1. Convert the Hubble constant to SI fundamental units.
    2. By how much does a meter of space expand in ten years? About how big is this?
    3. How far away in light years is a distant quasar if it appears to be moving away from us at 90% of the speed of light?
    4. How far away in light years is the edge of the observable universe? (Your answer to this question can also be used to determine the age of the universe.)
  2. Will the universe continue expanding forever or will gravity eventually cause it all to collapse in a big crunch?
    1. Derive an expression for the critical density of the universe. (Hint: Use the formulas for escape velocity, the Hubble law, and the density of a uniform sphere.)
    2. Compute the critical density in terms of hydrogen atoms per cubic meter.
    3. Speculate on the fate of the universe given that the mean density of a galaxy is roughly one hydrogen atom per cubic centimeter while the mean density of the space between galaxies is about one hydrogen atom per cubic meter.
    4. Speculate on the fate of the universe given that the Hubble constant appears to be increasing.

solution

The solutions to this practice problem can be found in the discussion section of this topic.

practice problem 4

Write something different.

solution

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